TSP042 | Jason Best – Transcription

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TSP043 | Gillian Zoe Segal – Transcription
TSP041 | Alicia Robb – Transcription

John:

Welcome to “The Successful Pitch” podcast. Today’s guest is Jason Best. He’s the author of “Crowdfund Investing for Dummies,” but Jason is no dummy, that’s for sure. He is the Entrepreneur-in-Residence at UC Berkeley. He tells us a story about going to the White House back in 2012, and being at the Rose Garden ceremony when President Obama signed into law, the new changes that allow crowdfunding to be very different, and allow people to invest where it’s been like that for 78 years, and he had to overcome 78 years of, “It’s always been done this way. You can’t possibly change the law. You’re crazy.” Of course, he didn’t give up. It took him over a year with some other people to make this happen, but he did it. He said, “Crowdfunding is a new way to do a difficult thing.” I think you’re really going to enjoy listening to Jason’s passion and insights on crowdfunding around the world.

Are you a founder struggling with your investor pitch? Do you need warm introductions to the right investors to get your startup funded? Do you need a funding roadmap to get you there fast? All of this and more can be found in Crack The Funding Code. Judy Robinett, bestselling author of How to be a Power Connector, and on the board of Illuminate Ventures invite you to our free Crack the Funding Code webinar. Simply go to JudyRobinett.com and click on the webinar tab to see how to tap into our network of investors around the world. There’s a link in the show notes as well. You’re only one click away from getting funded fast!

Hi, and welcome to “The Successful Pitch,” podcast. Today’s guest is Jason Best, and he has that last name for a reason, ladies and gentleman. He is the general partner at Crowd Capital Venture Fund, he has global experience. He literally works with the World Bank, and he’s one of the 3 people that’s responsible for creating the crowdfund investment framework. He’s also the Entrepreneur-in-Residence at UC Berkeley, for entrepreneurship and technology. His background prior to crowdfunding is building and leading SASS companies. He has been covered and visited the White House. I’m not going to talk about his background anymore. I’m just going to get him right on the show. Jason, Welcome.

Jason:

Hey. Thank you so much for having me today.

John:

Jason, I always like to ask our guests to tell us, how did you get to be such an expert in crowdfunding and entrepreneurship? Can you take us back to what your early background was? I know you worked for some companies and have some great track records, but how did you get so passionate and become an expert in crowdfunding?

Jason:

Well, first, thanks for having me on the show. It’s great to be here, and I guess my passion for entrepreneurship really was somewhat accidental in the beginning. I was working for different companies in the healthcare and consulting spaces, and then in 1998, sort of when the internet was shiny and new, some friends of mine … I was living on the East Coast, and some friends of mine told me, “Hey, look. You’ve got to get out here. Move out to the West Coast and figure out this internet thing. It’s really awesome.” It was one of those moments where, I think one of the biggest things in my life that I’ve learned is the power of saying “yes.”

The power of saying “yes” is so important because there have been so many times in my life where I could have said “yes,” or could have “no,” and saying “yes” has almost allows brought with it good things. Sometimes, probably a third or a half of the time, it’s unintended good consequences, but it’s interesting. I said “yes” to the opportunity, I moved out to the West Coast with no job, settled in San Francisco and over the course of a few weeks, found a job and began building a career in tech startups in the healthcare space. I built some experience in that model, was very fortunate to be a part of a couple of successful healthcare technology companies that were venture-backed and that had different types of exits, whether they were acquisition, or merger, or one went public, and so it just had a chance to see, from the very beginning of how to start a business, working with the founders of these companies, all the way through kind of the exit of those companies.

In August of 2010, I was at a friends wedding and I was talking with another friend of mine who had been a successful entrepreneur, as well, about the fact that this was back during the financial crisis, and small businesses couldn’t get money, and neither could many successful entrepreneurs. So, we talked about the fact that, “Look, if you give away money on Kickstarter, if you can lend money to entrepreneurs in the developing world through Kiva, why can’t I, as a regular American, invest in businesses that I use every day, or entrepreneurs that I believe in?” That was sort of the jumping off point for us to say, “How can we change these 80-year securities laws?” They were written back when most people did not have a landline telephone in their homes …

John:

Wow!

Jason:

… To reflect how we live our lives today. I mean, we live our lives online, with mobile devices, and Twitter, and LinkedIn, and Facebook. We also, if you look at the rest of our lives, social media and the web has really revolutionized almost every part of our lives, and even every part of the financial system, except for the private capital markets, for the way, private equity, venture capital, angel investing, and now crowdfunding. Really, it was about, how can we open up these markets to use these new tools to make it more efficient, more effective for entrepreneurs to raise money? That’s when we started our campaign.

We wrote our framework originally to change the laws and look, everybody told us we were crazy. Everybody told us we were wasting our time because it was never going to change, but we had equal parts of naivety, and I guess, just entrepreneurial stupidity to just keep trying, and just to keep working on it. Over the course of 460 days, we took our kind of framework from an idea to being in the Rose Garden of the White House, to watching President Obama signing the Jobs Act into law.

John:

What a thrill. I mean, congratulations, and thank you on behalf of all the entrepreneurs out there for your tenacity, your focus, your willingness to fight City Hall, if you will. I mean, when you have been told that something has been like this for 78 years, you’re crazy to try and change it, there was something inside you that has to be inside all successful entrepreneurs that didn’t take, “No, this is impossible,” for granted. I really want to dive into that a little bit. Also, we’re going to tweet out the power of saying “Yes.” I mean, what you did reminds me of people coming to San Francisco for the gold rush, right? I mean, they said, “This is where the opportunity is. I’m going.” You did the same thing. Take us back to that moment, because I love to hear what it felt like to stand in the Rose Garden, because I think it’s so important to have these moments of certainty, when you realize, “Wow. I didn’t give up and look where I am now,” and what does it feel like?

Because if you can share what it felt like to stand in the Rose Garden, after 460 days of perseverance, I can only imagine that that will give our readers a sense of what it’s like to stand in that Rose Garden at the White House and watch the President signing something into legislation that’s going to affect all kinds of people. I mean, the impact that you had, and I think that’s what a lot of entrepreneurs do, is they want to make a dent in the world, and make an impact. Do you mind just describing what the day was like and what it felt like to stand there?

Jason:

I tell you, it was one of the most surreal experiences of my life, because especially since, when the law passed, it had passed the house, it went to the senate, we went to the senate to actually watch the senate pass the bill, as well, and because of procedural maneuvering, basically we were told that it was going to pass that day, so we went to watch it pass, and because of procedural maneuvering in the senate, it didn’t. It didn’t pass. All of a sudden, the bill just got locked up, and we were afraid. “Oh, my gosh. Is this going to mean that the bill’s not going to pass and all this work’s going to die right here?” So, there was about 24 hours where we were unsure, this could have died. It was a very, very low point, of thinking we made it all this way, against all these odds, and it was out of our control at that point, because it was really up to the White House and the senate what was going to happen at that point.

After a lot of meetings, and conversations amongst the people who get to make those decisions, the next day it passed. It passed with over 75% of the senate voting “yes,” and so that moment, going from the depths of despair to this moment of, “Oh, my gosh, it passed,” was amazing. Receiving the invitation to the White House was another very surreal moment. It was just kind of, and then to actually be that day where you walk up to the gate, they hand over your pass and then you go through four layers of security, including walking by these dogs that are smelling you for explosives and everything else.

John:

Wow.

Jason:

Then, you’re in, you walk through the White House, and then you walk out into the Rose Garden, and it’s just this place where there’s been so much history. They signed a Middle East Peace Accords there, they’ve had all sorts of dignitaries there. You’re literally just a few feet away. You can see in the windows of the Oval Office, and you can see the President sort of walking around the Oval Office prior to him coming out. It was an incredible moment. It’s a beautiful place. It was an incredibly sunny, warm day. There were only about 100 guests invited, and from the crowdfunding industry, in total there were, I think, 11 of us. It was an incredible thrill, because there were different parts of the Jobs Act, so different people involved in different parts were invited. It was a great honor to be among such a small number of people from the industry who were invited to join, kind of recognizing our efforts. It was just one of those moments that I’ll never forget.

John:

I’ll bet. Thank you so much. That’s one of my favorite stories I’ve ever heard. You did such a great job that riding that roller coaster from the depths of despair when you don’t think it’s going to pass, to it’s passing, and then being invited, and then going through all that security. I mean, I felt like I was there with you. That’s what good storytelling is, and when someone makes a good pitch, that’s a classic example of bringing something to life, so thank you for that, Jason.

Jason:

Sure.

John:

What has changed since this is now in effect from 2012 to 2015? Can you tell us what’s the impact of that being signed now? What’s the … There’s a new law in existence now, over 3 years. I’m sure there’s a lot of things you can point to that because of this now being signed into legislation, people are able to?

Jason:

There’s kind of several layers to it. I’ll try to go through them quickly. There’s three provisions in the Jobs Acts that affect how entrepreneurs can increase their access to capital. The first one that went into effect almost 2 years ago, because basically, the law went into effect and then it had to go to the SEC, and then the SEC has to then write the exact rules and regulations, so that takes time. Then, they’ve been rolling those regulations out over the last 3 years. In the US, first, about 2 years ago, accredited investors, or individuals with more than a million dollars of liquid net worth were able to being investing through crowdfunding online, and that has now funded well in excess of a billion dollars worth of startups and small businesses have now been funded through that channel in the United States.

John:

Wow. Let’s just take a second on that. Congratulations. I mean, I wasn’t expecting that to be that big in that short amount of time. That’s an amazing accomplishment in 3 years. A billion dollars, that could never have been …

Jason:

Well, it’s the accomplishment of a lot of entrepreneurs who have worked really hard to raise that money. It’s a testament to the fact, because people, a lot of times people say, “It’s too hard to do this. You can’t raise money online. People aren’t going to invest in strangers. People aren’t going to do these things.” There’s a lot of things we’ve learned. There were a lot of naysayers all with this process, even after the bill passed, saying how it wouldn’t work and it couldn’t work. The fascinating thing I’ve learned is if you give an entrepreneur an opportunity to raise money for their businesses, they will do what is required to raise that money, and I think it’s also really important for your listeners to know that crowdfunding is, I always say, raising money for business is always difficult. Crowdfunding is not an easy way to raise money, it’s just a new way to do a difficult thing.

John:

Oh, I like that. We’re going to tweet that out. “A new way to do a difficult thing.” To me, it seems like what you have been able to accomplish with your other people that you did this with, with this new law is you laid down the railroad tracks where there were no railroad tracks, and now it’s up to people to get on a train and take the ride, but they couldn’t take the ride if the railroad tracks weren’t there. Is that a good analogy?

Jason:

I think that’s a good analogy.

John:

Okay, great.

Jason:

I do. I think that, and the work that we’ve done, we’ve now worked in 35 countries around the world around these issues around entrepreneurship and providing access to capital. The UK and Australia were the first 2 countries to really make this possible. The US followed behind, and it’s really the UK and the US leadership on the issue, which is sort of, and the economic needs of different countries, who need to stimulate entrepreneurship and innovation and stimulation job creation are recognizing the fact now that these sorts of laws must be enacted. We’ve had the privilege of working with different securities regulators, and different government ministries and organizations on trying to think about how do you create the right regulation, and the ecosystem to enable these sorts of crowdfunding opportunities to exist in other countries.

John:

You know, it’s so interesting to me that the UK was a little bit ahead of us, and I heard on one of your Bloomberg interviews that you said that the UK is actually a little bit more sophisticated than the US, and I think people think Silicon Valley’s the heart of everything in the world when it comes to startups, and being ahead of the game. What is it about the UK that makes them slightly more sophisticated or substantially more sophisticated, I’m not sure, than the US, when it comes to crowdfunding?

Jason:

It comes down to the regulators attitude about it. The regulators in the UK, so the UK industry went to the regulators and said, “Here’s what we want to do. Here’s how we want to do it. Can we? And the regulators worked with them over a period of time, they built trust, and they said, “Yes, let’s do this, but you have to keep us in the loop. We have to know what’s going on, and if things go wrong, then we’re going to shut it all down.” They took a “can do” attitude and they took a very proactive attitude, the regulator did, in allowing this to take place. But in the US, the SEC was very clear that absolutely nothing could take place until after they had completed all of their rulemaking, and there was absolutely zero desire on their part to enable any sort of testing or piloting of these programs. The other thing that’s really made the UK more sophisticated, and there’s certainly ample opportunity for the United States to join this sort of direction, they’ve created tax incentives for individuals to invest in startups and small businesses, very substantial tax incentives, like if you have gains on your investments in small businesses or startups are tax free. You can write off your tax losses for investments.

John:

It really reduces the risk, doesn’t it? That’s what I’ve understood.

Jason:

It reduces the risk, and it also, it doesn’t eliminate you losing the money, it just says that the government is not going to hit you over the head. It’s going to allow you to recognize that loss in a substantial way. Also, just enabling the fact that the UK treasury department has a study that came out in July that said that 70% of small businesses that raise capital and crowdfunding increase their sales. Why? Because when you turn your customers into investors, they become your best brand advocates.

John:

That’s so great. “Turn your customers into your brand advocates,” right?

Jason:

Right. Then, also they said that 60% of those businesses added employees, so it absolutely does create jobs in the country.

John:

Yes. Well, there’s so many things that I want to ask you about. I want to have you talk to us, you’re involved with 3 wonderful things. You’re the co-founder of the UC Berkeley program on innovation, you’re general partner at this Crowd Capital Venture Fund, which I’m guessing actually invests in startups, and then finally, you’re a venture partner at Vector Ventures, which is based in Hong Kong. I know you’re really involved. You’ve been to Malaysia and everything else around what’s going on around the world. Pick one of those 3 things and let’s take a little dive into one of those.

Jason:

Sure. The opportunity with Crowd Capital Ventures is really an opportunity for us to invest in what we call the “ecosystem of crowdfunding.” We’re just making investments in the space that really trying to foster 1 of 5 sectors in the crowdfunding ecosystem. It’s not us investing in businesses that are raising money on crowdfunding platforms. It’s us investing in the infrastructure that makes crowdfunding work.

John:

Ah, the railroad tracks again.

Jason:

Yeah, the railroad tracks again, absolutely. Number 1, the crowdfunding platforms, and the secondary markets. Sector 2 are trust and transparency tools, so that more people can engage in the market. Sector 3 is data and analytics companies, so they can turn all this mountains of data into actionable information on these platforms. Sector 4, the money transfer, and this is where the block chain is going to intersect with crowdfunding. How do you move money between individuals and across borders? Then, the 5th is the white space.

John:

Let me just ask about the block chain a little bit. Is that Bitcoin and all that kind of stuff a little bit?

Jason:

Exactly. It’s how do virtual currencies like Bitcoin, interact with crowdfunding? How do you use those sorts of things in raising capital, and moving money in a lower friction way? How do you use the block chain to enable more trust between two parties who don’t know each other?

John:

Right, and then the 5th one was white space, you said?

Jason:

White space, which is just, I mean there’s is much innovation that has occurred in different industries that we never dreamed up until they were possible. You know what I mean? For example, if someone had told you 10 years ago that you were going to use a device called a smartphone to call a stranger to come pick you up in their car, take you across town, and then it was going to be charged automatically to your credit card, I mean, I would have said you’re crazy.

John:

Or, Airbnb. That’s the one that most say, “That sounds insane. I’m not letting strangers in my home.”

Jason:

Right, and now it’s a multi-billion dollar business. Those are the type of white space opportunities that will exist in this market, as well.

John:

Nice. All right, so what’s going on with … You’re such an expert in this, Hong Kong and Malaysia, and China, and how can startups learn from that, and do those international companies, whether it’s the UK or Hong Kong, do they ever invest in crowdfunding things going on outside of their country, or is it strictly pretty much local?

Jason:

That’s a great question. I think that there’s a couple of things to think about that. What’s happening in Asia, there’s a lot of movement across Asia into enabling crowdfunding. In China, in mainland China, crowdfunding both on the debt and equity side, so when we talk about crowdfunding, we talk about equity crowdfunding, or exchanging shares for capital, as well on the debt side, I see people call that peer to business lending, or peer to peer lending. That’s what we call debt-based crowdfunding. Both of those markets in China have exploded over the last 3 years, even though there’s no regulation around either of those markets yet, in China. The government says it intends to regulate the market in 2016, but the markets are multi-billion dollar markets already today. Korea has, earlier this year, legalized equity crowdfunding. We have Malaysia that has already legalized equity crowdfunding and that will launch at the end of this year.

Singapore is studying how to launch equity crowdfunding by the end of the year. Thailand will launch equity crowdfunding by the end of the year. Other countries are starting, as well. Hong Kong is moving fairly slowly compared to its neighbors. It seems to be moving very, very slowly on this, and probably will be one of the last markets in Asia to enable equity and debt crowdfunding, but certainly others in the region are moving quickly. There’s a lot of activity because the need for job creation, the need for entrepreneurship development, innovation development, is very high in that region.

John:

Do they only invest, like let’s say Malaysia, those crowdfunding, do they only fund founders that are based in Malaysia, or are there opportunities for other people in other countries to get access to that?

Jason:

I guess I’d say I’ve got a couple of answers to that question. Primarily, people tend to fund things in their own country, and the other thing that the statistics are telling us so far is that most of the investors, the Kickstarter and other product pre-purchase crowdfunding, people are much more willing take a risk on a $75 or a $100 item that they’re pre-purchasing. Obviously making a $5000 or $10,000 investment is a very different mix of decisions. What we’re finding is that early on, and I like to say we’re sort of at page 60 of a 1000 page novel when it comes to this market, so we’re still very early on. Then, people are investing in businesses of someone that they know, or someone who they know they know. Like, first or second degree LinkedIn connections. That’s really where primarily the investors are coming from today.

What we need are these trust and transparency tools that I talked about before that will allow people who might be your third degree LinkedIn connections, or unaffiliated to you, gain enough confidence to make those sorts of investments at distance. I would say that there is capital from other countries that are looking for investments in the US, however, those investments tend to be large companies, brand names, established organizations, rather than startups. I think that primarily, the focus really should be for startups here in the US to be looking for investors here in the US.

John:

Right. What’s interesting is, I love this analogy you gave that we’re early on, we’re on page 60 of 1000 page novel, I believe you said?

Jason:

uh-huh (affirmative)

John:

That’s a great example for everybody listening of what great storytelling is. Instead of just staying we’re early on, you created an image, so instantly we can see a book that’s 1000 pages, and we’re only on page 60. That resonates. That’s what you do when you make a successful pitch, and I think that’s a great example. I want to thank you for that, because it comes to you somewhat naturally, I’m guessing, but it’s not a skill that everybody has, and it’s part of the reason you were able to get this incredible feat done that has been undoing something that’s stayed the same for 78 years. It’s that kind of storytelling, people, that allows people to see your vision and see what’s possible before it happens.

Do you see, as we get further in the book, to keep that analogy going a little bit, like let’s say we’re on page, I don’t know, 500, that eventually down the road, let’s say someone’s been really successful here, and they want to take their idea to another country. Like, for example, Uber has certainly grown globally really fast. Do you see the day that when they want to open in Hong Kong that some Hong Kong crowdfunding would be funding Uber because it’s been proven in the US?

Jason:

Yes. I think that what we’ll see, broadly speaking, I think in the next 5 to 7 years, we won’t talk about crowdfunding anymore. It’s just going to be funding. It’s just going to be the way businesses are funded, because what we’re also seeing is the hybridization of funding. By that I mean, entrepreneurs who are using sites like Kickstarter or product pre-sale websites as a way to prove that they have a customer for their business, for their product. Then, with that proof of, “I’ve got 500 customers,” the conversation they have with angel investors is very different than if they go to an angel with a prototype, because they’ve already got customers. “People paid me money for this.” It gives you significantly more power in that conversation that you had before. Then, what we’re seeing sometimes is angel investors might say, “Look, we’ll match whatever you’re able to raise through an equity crowdfunding website,” so there’s an ability for angels and the “crowd,” today, that’s the accredited investor crowd, to be able to make this happen.

Another way that this hybridization of funding is taking place is one of the challenges with angel investors was angel investors acting alone. It’s a very difficult model, that’s why angel groups were formed. One of the challenges with angel groups is the friction is very high in actually completing a transaction. I’ve got to schedule a dinner, I’ve got to show up, I’ve got to listen to 3 entrepreneurs, I’ve got to get some emails back and forth, look at some documents, and sign a paper, and wire a check, and it’s just very, very, high friction. What we’re seeing are angel groups are beginning to use this technology of online funding in a private way, or even publicly, to be able to fund deals faster. It just saves a lot of time for the entrepreneurs, and it saves a lot of time for the investors. The nice thing about these platforms is it also provides a lower point of entry.

Typically in the US, angel groups require you to write a check of 25,000 or $50,000 as a minimum to make an “angel investment.” If you’re new to this world, even if you have a lot of money, that may seem a little steep as an experiment, but if you’re able to use a crowdfunding site, crowdfund investing site, like OfferBoard or Seedinvest or CrowdFunder or others, you’re able to say, “Oh, I’m going to go and look at” … “Maybe I’ll just make a $5000 investment, or $10,000 investment.” That allows me to try this out at a lower price point, gain experience, and then move up to more traditional sizes of angel check writing.

John:

I love that. You know, once you have that social proof, that hybrid you were describing, the matching, if angel’s are going to feel a lot more comfortable matching if they can see a lot of other people through crowdfunding coming in, and getting to 50,000 then their 50,000 doesn’t feel as risky because even if it’s 10 people putting 5000 in, it’s still 10 other people who have validated this and think it’s a good use of their money.

Jason:

Yeah. I mean, what we’ve seen over and over again is people talk about the fear of fraud, and look, fraud’s a very real thing and we have to do everything we possibly can to guard against it, but when we look at the data of the amount of fraud that’s taken place through crowdfunding, it’s an incredibly, incredibly small number. One study from the Wharton Business School found that they looked at all the Kickstarter campaigns that have happened, and there’s now been over 85,000 of them, and there has been less than one-tenth of 1% of those campaigns that were proven to be fraudulent. I’m going to say that again. Less than one-tenth of 1%.

John:

That’s pretty low risk.

Jason:

It’s a tiny, tiny number.

John:

Yeah, that’s great. Well, before I let you go, I want to ask you about your book, “Crowdfund Investing for Dummies.” What a great …

Jason:

Our friends like to joke that it’s really “Crowdfund Investing by Dummies.” Should have been the title.

John:

Nice friends.

Jason:

We wrote the book, Wiley, the publisher of the “For Dummies” series came to us, and after the passage of the bill and just thought it’d be an interesting topic for entrepreneurs, and we were thrilled to be asked, and so we wrote the book, and it’s been out now for a while. It’s available on Amazon, electronically, and also in physical form, and other booksellers, as well. What it provides is some very tactical, practical suggestions about how entrepreneurs should be thinking about raising money, and they’re are also some sections on the book for investors, for people who are considering investing through this new mechanism, because it’s important for investors to know that anytime you invest in a startup or a small business, it’s a high-risk investment, and you should only put a very small portion of your capital to work through that particular asset class. It’s a portfolio play, and you want to spread your risk among a lot of different types of assets.

John:

That’s great. We’ll definitely put the link in the show notes for people to click and buy it right away, because anything you write I’m sure is worth the investment. Are there any other books, Jason, that you really like to have founder buy, either about life or business?

Jason:

Well, I mean, I think one of the most important books that I’ve read in the last year has been a book by Judy Robinett about the power of connecting, and just the importance of this concept of networking kind of has an “ick” factor about it. It sounds very mechanical, and it sounds something that’s not authentic. I think one of the things about Judy Robinett’s book is it really takes the “ick” out of networking, and it really is an important book for every entrepreneur to read, because it talks about how you can utilize your network, connect authentically, deliver value to your network, and then receive value in return. I just think that it’s a fantastic book.

John:

It is. It’s called “How to Be a Power Connector.” I’ve had the privilege of having Judy on the show, and we are happy to promote her book again. It’s a fantastic book. She works with founders on how to get funded with her “Crack the Funding Code” program. There’s lots of valuable information around Judy Robinett, her book, “How to Be a Power Connector.” We’ll put that link in the show notes, as well. Jason, how do people follow you on social media? What’s the best way to keep track of your latest interviews, and blogs, et cetera?

Jason:

Sure. My Twitter is crowdcapadvisor, @crowdcapadvisor. Then, our website is TheCCAGroup.com. Both of those have a lot of resources available from them, and happy to stay connected both ways.

John:

Fantastic. Jason, it’s been a pleasure having you on the show. Thanks for sharing that amazing story about being in the Rose Garden, and congratulations. I know that we’re only on page 60 of our 1000 page book, so I can’t wait to see what next chapters bring, and what a great impact you make on the world.

Jason:

Thank you so much for having me. It’s been a pleasure.

John:

All right, great. Bye. Thanks for listening to “The Successful Pitch” podcast. If you like the show, please go to iTunes and write a review, and encourage your friends to write reviews, too. It really helps to get the word out. People say that the longest distance is between someone’s mouth and their wallet. People can tell you they’re going to invest, but when it comes time to write the check, they don’t do it. How do you get people to say “yes” and then follow through? Visualize yourself on the left side of a river bank, and you have to cross the river, and on the other side of the river is where the funding happens. First, you make up your idea, then you make it real, then you make it reoccur. Once you start dipping your toe into the water to get to funding, that’s where I can help.

I get you across that river faster than you would on your own, with a lot less frustration than you will get when you hear a bunch of “no’s,” and you don’t know why. If you want some help getting funded faster with less frustration, go to my free funding webinar, SellingSecretsForFunding.com/webinar, sign up and get in-depth information on how you can get funded fast. Thanks.

TSP043 | Gillian Zoe Segal – Transcription
TSP041 | Alicia Robb – Transcription